Spot On: FURNITURE

(furniture, interior, lamps etc. )

Lovisa Hansson

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Lovisa Hansson, 31, Sweden

School: Danmarks Designskole

Department: Furniture

Specials: Furniture design.


Design background

Very broad, started as an artist painting a lot, then took a degree in preserving paintings. Trying now to mix different experiences in my furniture designs.

 

Important lessons learned during your education

To question different standards and myself and that good ideas need even better communication through design and media to become real consumer products.

 

Did you do anything prior to your education to strengthen your skills and to get into your school?

I have artistic background but needed to develop communicating them through different tools as sketching and presentation.

 

 

Project title

Silent Cloud

 

Length of project

10 weeks

 

Concept

Silent Cloud is a sound-absorbing cabinet designed to reduce the acoustic problems caused by today’s minimalist interiors.

The doors are made of molded felt, a material with very good sound-absorbing properties. The shape of the cabinet is developed in collaboration with an acoustic expert.

 

Inspiration

Cabinet 2192 designed in 1954 by Josef Frank for the interior design shop Svenskt Tenn.

 

 

Materials

Form pressed felt, solid ash wood, white lacquered MDF

 

Keywords for the visual design

Classic with a modern twist

 

How is your work process when you design?

I usually start a project by exploring different ideas on the market and in my surrounding. When I have several different ideas I try to evaluate them through sketching with combination of model making or 3D visualizing. After going through this process the strongest fragments usually survive and together build up the final result, a product concept or a family of products.

 

 

Which part of the process is the hardest for you to work through?

The final one when you must exclude a lot or have to compare ideas those sometimes seem to be equal in each sense.

 

In your experience, are there specific skills that would be helpful to master?

Cooperation with other disciplines or designers. Good communication through different designer tools.

 

What are your strengths?

I have a quick process in visualizing ideas through models. I also like the challenge to solve upcoming problems.

 

What are your weaknesses?

In some projects I prioritize finalizing concrete and practical solutions before emotional or conceptual ideas that are generally harder to communicate through products or furniture.

 

 

Do you turn to specific areas for inspiration in general?

Architecture, auctions with historical things from different time periods, design blogs, art.

 

Any designers you find inspirational?

Many, for example contemporary designers like Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec, Naoto Fukasawa, Patricia Urquiola.

 

Other students you find inspirational?

I often find the work of students from other design disciplines working with other materials like ceramics, glass, graphic design or fashion inspirational.

 

Is your work process based on a special approach towards design?

To design individual furniture with strong identity and improved emotional or functional solutions than existing.

 

 

Do you have a dream scenario for you and your design in the future?

To design products that achieve the ambition in my approach towards design.

 

Has it always been a dream to work with design?

Not a dream, but always an exciting and challenging wish.

 

Why did you choose this specific specialization?

When thinking design furniture design has always been on top of my mind.

 

Do you have any other projects you would like to highlight?

Yes, the one called “Felt Mountain” and soon a site www.studioblackbird.se that I share together with an industrial designer.

 

Were can we find more information about you?

At the site mentioned above.

 

Contact info

info@studioblackbird.se

Signe Balling

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Signe Balling, 25, Denmark

School: The Danish Design School

Department: Furniture and Spatial Design

Specials: Furniture, detailed finishing

 

Design background

Art school for 2 months, basic education as goldsmith and bachelor from the Danish Design School.

 

Important lessons learned during your education

Trust your instincts and stay true to your decisions. Don’t let anyone tell you that your idea is impossible!

 

Did you do anything prior to your education to strengthen your skills and to get into your school?

I went to an art school for 2 months and took drawing lessons for 5 months.

 

 

Project title

A tension!

 

Length of project

5 weeks

 

Concept

The dining table consists of a solid wood tabletop, a metal tube apron, and four legs made of spring steel. The four legs have a bend on the middle from where the rods “extend” towards the corners of the tabletop and the apron. The most marrow end of each of the legs locks into the table’s apron and the other end is forced in place on the corners of the tabletop.

I have chosen to pair my table up with Arne Jacobsen’s “7” chairs, because the corners of the table and the back of the chair have the same curvature.

 

Inspiration

Piet Hein’s “Superellipse” table and Niels Jørgen Haugesen’s “X-line” chair.

 

Materials

Spring steel rod, square metal tube and stained solid wood.

 

Keywords for the visual design

Functional, simplicity and details.

 

 

How is your work process when you design?

I usually start by drawing the essential lines of my idea on paper and quickly switch to making paper models and small-scale pieces in a realistic material. I then go to either drawing on the computer or making muck-ups, then making the basic construction in a cheep material to get all the right measurements and at the end in the right material.

 

Which part of the process is the hardest for you to work through?

The first part of the process, when everything is possible. I like knowing what possibilities I have and haven’t for the next steps otherwise it is hard to focus.

 

In your experience, are there specific skills that would be helpful to master?

Planning my time. Always plan more days!

I always finish in time, but am totally exhausted in the end.

 

What are your strengths?

Not just settling for what’s good enough.

 

What are your weaknesses?

Being too ambitious, when I don’t have the time. Not being realistic within the time limit.

 

 

Do you turn to specific areas for inspiration in general?

Mostly technical functions, nautical details and structures in nature. And anything untraditional.

 

Any designers you find inspirational?

Alexander Lervik, Carlo Volf, Tom Rossau og Verner Panton.

 

Other students you find inspirational?

Benjamin Nordsmark

 

Is your work process based on a special approach towards design?

Making design functional and beautiful at the same time.

 

 

Do you have a dream scenario for you and your design in the future?

Working together with other creative people and being able to make a living from designing producible and one of a kind unique art/furniture pieces.

 

Has it always been a dream to work with design?

Since I went to Paris about 12 years ago, but I have always had creative hobbies.

 

Why did you choose this specific specialization?

Furniture is such a big part of our daily life and I like the many options in materials and products.

 

Do you have any other projects you would like to highlight?

My favorite project and piece of furniture/art: My Cyklus chair made from a continuous metal tube and inflated bicycle tube.

 

 

Contact info:

Signe Balling

T: +0045 60 92 04 63

M: sijor@student.dkds.dk

Soon: http://www.signeballing.com

 

Written by Josephine Dohlmann

January 25, 2011 at 19:59

Marcel Granfelt Saavedra

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Marcel Granfelt Saavedra, 25, Sweden

School: Konstfack

Department: Interior architecture and furniture design

Specials: Furniture design

 


Design background

Bachelor in industrial design Lund.

 

Important lessons learned during your education

To fail.

 

Did you do anything prior to your education to strengthen your skills and to get into your school?

No.

 

 

Project title

Morgonstund

 

Length of project

5 weeks

 

Concept

The concept is to create a cabinet which changes visually depending on the space and light sources.

 

Inspiration

The light that hits you on the way home from the party an early morning in July.

 

Materials

Mdf and some recycled wood from an old porch.

 

 

Keywords for the visual design

Morning sky, graphical, light and shadows

 

How is your work process when you design?

I never sketch or write anything I got everything in my head. I work with a theme and start creating from that. I try to get in the workshop as fast as possible and work with models in scale 1:1.

 

Which part of the process is the hardest for you to work through?

Probably somewhere in the end when I start to doubt my idea. It always happens.

 

 

Do you turn to specific areas for inspiration in general?

Not really, it could be anything.

 

Any designers you find inspirational?

Maarten Baas, Jamie Hayon, Front

 

Other students you find inspirational?

Sophia Lithell

Jenny Ekdahl

 

 

Is your work process based on a special approach towards design?

I work often conceptually and more with a story then function.

 

Do you have a dream scenario for you and your design in the future?

To conquer the world and make it a bit more enjoyable.

 

Has it always been a dream to work with design?

Not specific design, but anything that I find creative. I still wish to work with a little bit of everything in the artistic field.

 

Were can we find more information about you?

www.marcelsaavedra.com

Contact info

Marcel.granfeltsaavedra@student.konstfack.se

Written by Josephine Dohlmann

November 12, 2010 at 00:38

Sara Wright Polmar

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Sara Wright Polmar,  27, Norway

School: Kunsthøgskolen i Oslo, Oslo National Academy of the Arts

Department: Interior architecture and furniture design

Specials: Furniture

Design background:

Bachelor in Teacher Training Art and Design spring 07

Currently in my second year of my bachelor in Interior Architecture and Furniture design

Important lessons learned during your education:

I have learned a lot by being in the workshops, by physically working with the materials. You discover a lot of things you did not expect or couldn’t see until you have an object in front of you. Enthusiasm and believing in what you are doing is also very important – if you don’t believe in it, others probably won’t either.

Did you do anything prior to your education to strengthen your skills and to get into your school?

My education in Teacher Training Art and Design is extremely valuable to me, even if I never become a teacher. There, I got to work with many different materials and techniques, and learned a lot. I also met brilliant and inspiring students, and that has been an important part of my own development. I believe that all the things you do and learn, even if they don’t seem relevant, are important in some way or another.

Project title: Stack

Length of project: A little hard to say, as it was something I did outside of school. I thought about if for a while before I had the time to actually work on it.

Concept: Stack is a hall stand that invites you to contribute to the shaping of your own surroundings. The loose wooden cylinders can be stacked onto a solid core in any desired order and exchanged at will.

Inspiration: Stacking toys

Materials: Metal core with oak and pine cylinders

Keywords for the visual design: Playfulness, variation, individuality

How is your work process when you design?

I always start by writing down keywords, to sort my thoughts and ideas. Then I sketch, of course, and as soon as I can I start working with mock-ups and

scale modeling. To me, this is the best part of the design process.

Which part of the process is the hardest for you to work through?

The creative process is fun and exciting, but it is also exhausting! When you feel like you are going nowhere, and when you have no idea what you are doing – it’s frustrating, but an important part of creating something good! It can also be hard to stay enthusiastic though the process, it’s easy to become blind and have doubts when it comes to your own work.

In your experience, are there specific skills that would be helpful to master?

I wouldn’t mind being more skilled at 3D drawing- and I would have loved to have a background in cabinetmaking.

What are your strengths?

I am enthusiastic and independent – I like figuring things out on my own.

What are your weaknesses?

I can be too impatient and work a bit too quickly. I think I need to work on not being afraid to “wander around” in the process without knowing what I am doing.

Do you turn to specific areas for inspiration in general?

I spend a lot of time surfing the Internet, and also find inspiration in random things in my surroundings.

Any designers you find inspirational?

Ray and Charles Eames (playful, yet elegant), The Bouroullec brothers, Cathrine Kullberg. A lot of young Norwegian designers are doing interesting stuff.

Other students you find inspirational?

I was really impressed with a lot of the work in the Greenhouse area at Stockholm Furniture Fair, there are definitely a lot of inspiring students! And Kristine Bjaadal- her master assignment from KhiO is wonderful!

Is your work process based on a special approach towards design?

Humor and playfulness is important to me, design shouldn’t have to be serious. I want my surroundings to be uplifting and interesting, both visually and functional. I wish to incorporate this in the work I do.

Do you have a dream scenario for you and your design in the future?

If I can make a living working with furniture design I would be really grateful. I would love to have a workshop and studio, where I can make prototypes and maybe one-offs.

Has it always been a dream to work with design?

I have always known that I wanted to do something creative, but not necessarily furniture design.

Why did you choose this specific specialization?

Solving problems, and working with materials, colors and forms make me happy!

Were can we find more information about you?

My-soon-to-come website

www.sarapolmar.no

Contact info:

sarapolm@khio.no

Written by Josephine Dohlmann

May 15, 2010 at 15:58

Posted in Uncategorized

Erik Rosin

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Erik Rosin, 25, Sweden

School: Beckmans College of Design

Department: Product & Interior Design

Specials: Strategic and Graphic Design 


Design background

– 1 year of Art History at Södertörn University

– 1 year of Three-dimensional Design & Architecture at Nyckelviksskolan

– 3 years at Beckmans College of Design 

Important lessons learned during your education

 To listen, research, question, visualize, cooperate, create, inspire and work hard. 

Did you do anything prior to your education to strengthen your skills and to get into your school?

I worked at a nine to five job in a store, which was a great way of getting motivation and energy to start studying. It also keeps you grounded. 

Project title

 Origami nemuro – Kami / Kuro / Fuji 

Length of project

 8 weeks 

Concept 

A sleeping place is often static in both its expression and function, even though the need for sleep is everything but static when you live together. One wants to read whilst the other wants to sleep. One rises early whilst the other has a lie-in. The soft module Kuro transforms the bed according to the user’s needs. Make a blackout, a headboard, a silencer or just a decoration of an unmade bed. 
 
The bed Kami has a bedding that is foldable according to needs and the bedside table Fuji has the shape of an extended tetrahedron. The shapes of the three units are inspired by origami, geometry and the golden ratio. The choice of materials, where life cycle thinking is central, is influenced by the Japanese philosophy Wabi-Sabi. What nature has created can be decomposed by nature.  

Inspiration

 Origami, geometry and Wabi-Sabi 

Materials

 Kami (bed) – Pine, latex, steel, cotton, wool, Valchromat

Kuro (module) – Latex, wool

Fuji (table) – Valchromat 

Keywords for the visual design

 I started out by folding paper, and wanted to transfer the fragility and angular form of it into full-scale interior.  

How is your work process when you design?

 I put a lot of focus on the research and concept making phase, being the phase where the crucial part lies whether a project will be taking responsibility and be an inspirational one. 

Which part of the process is the hardest for you to work through?

Building stuff. 

In your experience, are there specific skills that would be helpful to master?

Positivity, creativity, questioning and progressivism.

What are your strengths?

Researching, questioning, approaching people, asking for help, taking the initiative to cooperate, idea making, implementation on a strategical and organizational level. 

What are your weaknesses?

 Building stuff on my own. Often I don’t lack the knowledge on how to do it, just the motivation of actually doing it. 

Do you turn to specific areas for inspiration in general?

Nature, humans,  space. 

Any designers you find inspirational?

– Nirvan Richter, architect, furniture designer and founder of Norrgavel.

– Zandra Ahl, glass and ceramics professor at Konstfack University of Arts, Crafts and Design.

– Mathilda Tham, professor in sustainability at Goldsmiths College in London and Beckmans College of Design. 

Other students you find inspirational?

Many in general, no one in particular. 

Is your work process based on a special approach towards design?

Yes, one  where taking responsibility and creating inspiration is in focus. By taking responsibility I mean through an ecological, economical and humanistic point of view. I see the designer roll partly as a creator of long term strategic goals with the intention to create a sustainable world. Inspiration is one of the ways of getting there.  

Do you have a dream scenario for you and your design in the future?

To be able to work with design both on a macro level as a strategy and on a micro level with interiors, furniture, products and graphic design. 

Has it always been a dream to work with design?

No, I started this path unconsciously about nine years ago, and consciously about five years ago. Before I loved learning languages, and I saw myself working as an interpreter/translator.   

Why did you choose this specific specialization?

Products, furniture, interiors and graphic design are things which are close to us in our daily life, hopefully they tell stories and you appreciate them for their function. I thought design had the possibility to change and inspire people in their daily life. Today I still believe this, but design has opened my eyes to the possibility of being a process which can be applied in much larger structural complexities.  

Do you have any other projects you would like to highlight?

I am currently working with my Bachelor exam project, where I investigate how I can create a design process which is taking responsibility and is inspirational at the same time. My intention is then to transform the theory into practice, exhibiting four inspirational projects in the areas of furniture, product/service design, graphic design and film. 
 
 
 
 

Where can we find more information about you?

www.erikrosin.com 

Contact info 

Erik Rosin Studio

Theory & practice

info@erikrosin.com

www.erikrosin.com

+46 73 969 85 55

Written by Josephine Dohlmann

March 30, 2010 at 07:54

Magnus Sangild

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Magnus Sangild, 27, Denmark

School: The Danish Design School

Department: Product Design

Specials: Furniture & Spatial

Design background 

4 years as a cabinetmaker, 5 years at the design school and half a year at Studio/ Louise Campbell – now running my own company in the hearth of Copenhagen making furniture, product and spatial designs.


Important lessons learned during your education

Most important is being independent and believe in yourself and stick with it.

Did you do anything prior to your education to strengthen your skills and to get into your school?

I worked as a cabinetmaker for four years and I had some drawing courses before I applied to The Danish Design School.

Project title

MagicMagnusMountain

Length of project 

 12 weeks

Concept

Make a furniture with a rough visual layout.

Inspiration 

The skerry/rocklike surroundings in and around Gothenburg

Materials

Threaded Carbon Fibers and Epoxy

Keywords for the visual design

Mountain, Tactile, Transparent, Rough, Interaction.

How is your work process when you design?

I often starts with a moodboard showing in which direction I want the process to go, my designs are made with intuition of an interaction between the design product and the viewer and I would like to tell a visual story with my designs. This means that the interaction reflects on some sort of reaction from the viewer, this also being whether he/she likes the piece or not.

Then I start sketching while experimenting with different materials that I already have selected, making small visual drafts showing the main ideas of the concept. Bringing it to the computer where I detail the designs and put dimensions to it – after that I build a prototype in scale 1:1 where I test the materials and proportions.   

Which part of the process is the hardest for you to work through?

The first part of the project, for me, is nerve wrecking – this is when I’m not in full control of the process, the project could end up in so many different ways. The best way of describing it, is like being in love with girl. I see myself running around trying different things, ends up disappointed and head down most of the times, but when I find the right path of the design my hearth starts beating really fast and adrenalin pumps through my vains, I get an energy rush that’s indescribable.


What are your strengths?

That I dare to be different and that I make designs that focus on the emotional relationship that emerges from furniture’s with a visual history.

What are your weaknesses?

There are many but to name one, I’m really bad at making beautiful hand drawings.

Do you turn to specific areas for inspiration in general?

Graphic design has always been a huge impact on my designs, also I have gained a lot of tactile input from being in a relationship with a textile designer.

Any designers you find inspirational?

Marcel Wanders, Tom Dixon, Louise Campbell, Thomas Bentzen, Henrik Vibskov etc.

Other students you find inspirational?

Alexander Høst, fashion designer, great friend and a great discussion partner.

Is your work process based on a special approach towards design?

I am very inspired by interdisciplinary exchange and I think the best way to describe my way of designing is a field called “cross over” where design meets art.

Do you have a dream scenario for you and your design in the future?

The dream scenario would be that I can stay independent in all means that concern economy and creativity and still focus on being different.

Has it always been a dream to work with design?

No not really, but since I was 16 though.

Why did you choose this specific specialization?

It came as a natural continuation of being a cabinetmaker and to develop my own design language. Also I felt a responsibility to increase the diversity on the furniture market. For me it is equally important that the product tells a tale and have a very obvious function.  

Do you have any other projects you would like to highlight?

Medusa a stool: http://www.magnussangild.com/index.php?/project/medusa/

Creator table and bench: http://www.magnussangild.com/index.php?/project/creator/


Were can we find more information about you?

www.magnussangild.com

Contact info

Magnus Sangild

Slejpnersgade 10. 4th

2200 København N

+45 2532 8982

info@magnussangild.com

Written by Josephine Dohlmann

March 10, 2010 at 11:47

Ernesto García

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Ernesto García, 29, Mexico 

School: Konstfack, University College of Arts Crafts and Design, Sweden

Department: Inredningsarkitektur & möbeldesign

Specials: Interior and Furniture Design 

Design background

August 1998 –  May 2003: BA in Industrial Design, Universidad Iberoamericana, Mexico city 

August 2002 to June 2005: Abstracta Studio, own project, Mexico city 

August 2005 to August 2009: Esrawe studio (www.esrawe.com), Designer Senior, Mexico city 

August 2009- in progress (June 2011)

MA In Space, Inredningsarkitektur & möbeldesign, Konstfack, University College of Arts, Crafts and Design, Stockholm Sweden 


 

Important lessons learned during your education

To be conscious of how design affects the space and the people in which is in contact. 

Did you do anything prior to your education to strengthen your skills and to get into your school?

I apply to competitions that I found interesting, I think it is a good way to make a portfolio if you don´t have work experience. 

Project title

Oserí Shelve

Length of project

 6 weeks

Concept

Oserí Shelve is a flexible system compound of three different parts, box 40cm x 30cm x 30cm, box  60cm x 30cm x 30cm and a hanger. The basic idea is that the user can build a grid on the wall each 50cm with the hangers and then start to hang the boxes.

The boxes can interact between each other or with other hangers in this way the user can create different compositions.

My intention is to create a shelve that last long by changing towards the users needs and desires, for instance if you need more space to storage you can get more boxes.

Oserí shelve can also adapt easy to the new space when you move. I think also that this kind of furniture makes easy for you to feel comfortable in the new space because at the same time that it has a new shape it remind you your previous house. 

Inspiration

I got inspiration from “raramuris” a semi nomad tribe form north Mexico; they have to move each winter to a warmer place. Their objects are neglected, they can not put more attention to them because probably they have to leave them when move.

I start to make links with this culture and our culture in which way objects are more important for us. Also I wondered which kind of objects requires a semi nomad society?

We are semi nomad; at least we have to move 2 or 3 times in our life. 

Materials

Wood board and metal sheet 

Keywords for the visual design

Ordered chaos 

How is your work process when you design?

I would say everything but organize. It is going back and forward between the both parts of my brain. 

Which part of the process is the hardest for you to work through?

To make the final presentation for the client, It is a lot of work but it is important only show what it is relevant for the project. 

In your experience, are there specific skills that would be helpful to master?

Critical thinking. Always question if things should be done in that way.

What are your strengths?

Patience I could say.

What are your weaknesses?

I get interested for so many thinks that It becomes really difficult to manage. 

Do you turn to specific areas for inspiration in general?

Everyday life and art. I think art is ahead of design.

Any designers you find inspirational?

Tapio Virkala and Achille Castiglioni

Other students you find inspirational?

I could say everyone, Konstfack is full of talent but I can mention Johana Landin, Karolina Nyström and Keisuke Kawase  

Is your work process based on a special approach towards design?

I could say that process is in between architecture, industrial design and interior design.

Do you have a dream scenario for you and your design in the future?

Not really, I have to think about it. 

Has it always been a dream to work with design?

Yes

Why did you choose this specific specialization?

Since I started to study design I feel attracted by furniture.

Do you have any other projects you would like to highlight?

Piñata furniture is still in development. It is furniture made with recycled paper and natural glue. (check blog for more information – link below. red.)

Were can we find more information about you?

ernesto-garcia-design.blogspot.com 

Contact info

neto_gar@hotmail.com

Written by Josephine Dohlmann

March 3, 2010 at 21:56